Crated CRUELTY
A new undercover investigation by Mercy For Animals Canada at a Quebec veal factory farm reveals baby calves crammed into crates barely larger than their own bodies, punched and kicked by workers, and left to suffer without proper veterinary care.
WHAT THE INVESTIGATION EXPOSED:
Calves crammed into crates so small they couldn't walk or turn around
Workers violently kicking, punching, throwing, and tormenting calves
Sick and injured animals left to suffer without proper veterinary care
<
>
CRATE CRITICS
<
“This video provides clear evidence of deliberate institutionalized animal abuse in Canada's veal industry. Veal calves are shown imprisoned in narrow stalls on slatted floors. Many animals are chained so tightly that they can barely move or can only perform a few short movements, which they do repeatedly.”
John Sorenson, PhD
“No animal should be so physically limited in its' movement. The calf can stand or lie in one place only. He can't turn around, lick his back, or stretch out. The chain around his neck ensures that he can't lie down flat (something that calves do naturally). Not surprisingly, stereotypies are common. ”
Mary Richardson, DVM
“Cows are highly intelligent and sentient, feeling beings, and it's clear that the calves in this video are suffering. Deep fear and pain can be seen in their eyes and in their behavior. Calves are just as sentient as dogs - we would never tolerate such abuse inflicted upon a dog.”
Marc Bekoff, PhD
“Veal crates are the epitome of a poor animal housing system, and it is almost shocking to see them still being used... Studies have shown that calves tethered in stalls have higher physiological stress responses than those kept in groups or in pairs.”
Sara Shields, PhD
“In all my experience, this is the worst, cruelest system that I have ever seen, in every sense, housing, health and stockmanship. [T]he system as seen on the video is now illegal in Europe, both in regard to individual housing, and denial of access to solid feed containing sufficient digestible fibre.”
John Webster, PhD
“Psychologically, the isolation and restricted movement [of veal crates] thwarts the calves need to suckle from their dam, prevents social interaction with their mother and with other calves, severely limits mental stimulation and investigative behavior, and disallows any sort of play.”
Debi Zimmermann, DVM
“Veal stalls... we need to get rid of, plain and simple.”
Temple Grandin, PhD
>
  
NATURE VS. FACTORY FARMS
<

NATURE

Cows and their calves share a powerful and immediate bond. In natural herds, mothers and their offspring remain together as grazing partners for years after the babies have matured to adulthood and often become lifelong friends.

FACTORY FARMS

On dairy factory farms, baby calves are ripped away from their mothers' sides shortly after birth. Because they will never produce milk, males are often sold for veal production. They will spend their short, miserable lives confined to a tiny wooden box.

NATURE

Like human infants, newborn calves have a strong natural desire to suckle. If given the chance, baby calves will nurse from their mothers up to 10 times a day. Calves who nurse naturally typically grow up to be stronger, healthier, and more active than those who don't.

FACTORY FARMS

On veal factory farms, calves never get to nurse from their mothers. They are fed an artificial milk replacer in a bucket, thwarting their suckling instinct. The chronic frustration leads to abnormal or neurotic behaviours, such as sham-chewing and head-tossing.

NATURE

Calves in a natural environment love to gallop, buck, and play with other calves. These social and intelligent animals are known to develop deep and lifelong friendships with cows and other animals, including humans.

FACTORY FARMS

On factory farms, calves are crammed into wooden crates barely larger than their own bodies. These playful animals never get to feel the grass beneath their feet or the sun on their backs. They are denied relationships with family and friends, and never feel safe or loved.
>
22033 - 131 BLOOR ST. W.   |   TORONTO, ONTARIO M5S 1R1   |   1‑888‑875‑6170   |   INFO@MERCYFORANIMALS.CA